HTML Tags for Java Applets, circa 1999

In 1999, I took a class in Java at Santa Monica College. I was intested at the time in the small variations among how The W3C, Sun, Netscape, and Microsoft specified the <APPLET> tag.

So here are how each specified the tag in 1999, minus the formatting of the original pages:

W3C - HTML 3.2 | W3C - HTML 4.0 | Microsoft | Netscape | Sun

http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/struct/objects.html#h-13.4

13.4 Including an applet: the APPLET element

APPLET is deprecated (with all its attributes) in favor of OBJECT. 

See the Transitional DTD for the formal definition. 

Attribute definitions

codebase = uri [CT] 
     This attribute specifies the base URI for the applet.
     If this attribute is not specified, then it defaults
     the same base URI as for the current document. Values
     for this attribute may only refer to subdirectories of
     the directory containing the current document. 
code = cdata [CS] 
     This attribute specifies either the name of the class
     file that contains the applet's compiled applet
     subclass or the path to get the class, including the
     class file itself. It is interpreted with respect to
     the applet's codebase. One of code or object must be
     present. 
name = cdata [CS] 
     This attribute specifies a name for the applet
     instance, which makes it possible for applets on the
     same page to find (and communicate with) each other. 
archive = uri-list [CT] 
     This attribute specifies a comma-separated list of URIs
     for archives containing classes and other resources
     that will be "preloaded". The classes are loaded using
     an instance of an AppletClassLoader with the given
     codebase. Relative URIs for archives are interpreted
     with respect to the applet's codebase. Preloading
     resources can significantly improve the performance of
     applets. 
object = cdata [CS] 
     This attribute names a resource containing a serialized
     representation of an applet's state. It is interpreted
     relative to the applet's codebase. The serialized data
     contains the applet's class name but not the
     implementation. The class name is used to retrieve the
     implementation from a class file or archive.

     When the applet is "deserialized" the start() method is
     invoked but not the init() method. Attributes valid
     when the original object was serialized are not
     restored. Any attributes passed to this APPLET instance
     will be available to the applet. Authors should use
     this feature with extreme caution. An applet should be
     stopped before it is serialized.

     Either code or object must be present. If both code and
     object are given, it is an error if they provide
     different class names. 

width = length [CI] 
     This attribute specifies the initial width of the
     applet's display area (excluding any windows or dialogs
     that the applet creates). 
height = length [CI] 
     This attribute specifies the initial height of the
     applet's display area (excluding any windows or dialogs
     that the applet creates). 

Attributes defined elsewhere 

     id, class (document-wide identifiers) 
     title (element title) 
     style (inline style information) 
     alt (alternate text) 
     align, hspace, vspace (visual presentation of objects,
     images, and applets) 

This element, supported by all Java-enabled browsers, allows
designers to embed a Java applet in an HTML document. It has
been deprecated in favor of the OBJECT element.

The content of the APPLET acts as alternate information for
user agents that don't support this element or are currently
configured not to support applets. User agents must ignore
the content otherwise. 
 DEPRECATED EXAMPLE:
 In the following example, the APPLET element includes a
 Java applet in the document. Since no codebase is supplied,
 the applet is assumed to be in the same directory as the
 current document. 

    <APPLET code="Bubbles.class" width="500" height="500">
    Java applet that draws animated bubbles.
    </APPLET>



This example may be rewritten as follows with OBJECT as follows: 

   <P><OBJECT codetype="application/java"
           classid="java:Bubbles.class"
           width="500" height="500">
   Java applet that draws animated bubbles.
   </OBJECT>

Initial values may be supplied to the applet via the PARAM element. 
 DEPRECATED EXAMPLE:
 The following sample Java applet: 

    <APPLET code="AudioItem" width="15" height="15">
    <PARAM name="snd" value="Hello.au|Welcome.au">
    Java applet that plays a welcoming sound.
    </APPLET>

 may be rewritten as follows with OBJECT: 

    <OBJECT codetype="application/java"
            classid="AudioItem" 
            width="15" height="15">
    <PARAM name="snd" value="Hello.au|Welcome.au">
    Java applet that plays a welcoming sound.
    </OBJECT>
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